22 July 2013

How Not to Make Fajitas but How to Drink Tequila - by my Venezuelan Students.

Gallivanting as one does, it's necessary to cater for the resident Foreign Language students before I go anywhere.  They like their own food, naturally, so it suits us all if they have the ingredients in the fridge to do with as they please whilst we're away for the occasional night or two.

So when it came to the married Venezuelans (that weren't 24 year old cousins who wanted to share a room, as the school had said they were!) I bought them everything they needed to make Fajitas - or so I thought:  Chicken, peppers, onions, wraps and those trays of salsa, guacamole and sour cream.

When most of the stuff was still there on our return, Mrs. V told me that she had made a salad instead.  She was a bit shifty and I was a bit curious, but couldn't really have cared less because it was such a relief to have had a bit of a break from everything!  To use it up though, I bought some more ingredients and asked her to show me how it's done in her country and she very graciously taught me how it isn't:


Mr. and Mrs. Venezuelan.

They use minced beef only - fried with no fat.

I'd bought chicken - but we fried it with no fat.


They use green peppers only - cooked in butter and garlic - not oil.
 
Let's pretend they're green but they were cooked in butter and garlic. 

They don't use trays of ready made stuff, but fresh avocado and home-made tomato and onion salad, which means cutting them up really small and adding garlic, oil and vinegar.  They call it 'Pico Gallo' - pronounced Pico Gajjo.  And they make sour cream with mayo, coriander and what they call lemons, but we call limes.  This caused even further consternation all round!


Proper Pico Gallo


They eat fajitas for lunch, not in the evening and usually only at week ends, not during the week. No prizes for guessing what time of day this was or which days it wasn't.








How not to make Fajitas - delicious, nevertheless!

But because it was the evening. we managed to stick with some tradition by washing them down with a little Tequila.

Good Tequila should be 'blonde,' not clear and it is drunk out of shot glasses in Venezeula.  In Mexico they call these special glasses 'Caballito' - which means 'Little Horse.'

It's not done to get drunk - they will only ever have two shots at a time - to be 'happy.'  It's their culture to stop drinking alcohol at 'happy.'  They wouldn't dream of drinking it before parties - parties are for drinking - but beer on the beach is ok!

They say Cheers with 'Salut' and raise their glasses with their left hand, meaning they will drink again.  If they drink with their right hand, it means they will only partake of one which will offend!

They may have shown me how not to make fajitas, but they showed me the right way to drink Tequila.




30 comments:

  1. Only you my dear could have tequila drinking lessons on your blog! The mere thought of it reminds me of the state my sister used to come home in having partaken of *ahem* more than 2...

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    1. LOL! Is it wrong that makes me proud? I bet your sister was in a worse state the following day - I've had my share of Tequila hangovers, having partaken of *ahem* more than 2 x

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  2. I love this Anya! The drinking and the pico gallo looks amazing.

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  3. Oooh I would never have know that about the left hand. Wonder how many mexicans I've offended! Mind you I always drink again ;)

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    1. Well you would have offended Venzuelans by calling them Mexicans - LOL! But you'd have won them round and charmed them into drinking so many shots they would never have remembered :)

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  4. you'll have to teach me now I have a bottle here but only made cocktails with it! Great to be taught by the locals :)

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    1. You'll have to be gentle with me, but you could twist my arm ;)

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  5. Or you can just chuck it in a Margherita like I do. Hic.

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    1. They said something about that when I inquired - but I think they don't really drink it there - forgot to mention that!

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  6. I LOVE this Anya! Absolutely brilliant, I reckon you and I should do a cookery book together :D

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  7. Yummo! And may I say, DING DONG! HUBBA HUBBA!(ok that last bit was directed at the man)

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  8. I really enjoyed this, fascinating insight into another culture. Lovely to meet your house guests too!

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    1. I must post more of these - I tend to take them for granted, thanks :)

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  9. I love this sort of food, so some lovely tips there for making it more authentic and tastier! Plus love a shot of tequila- yum!

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    1. It 's so simple, but really tasty, you're right. You and tequila just sit right, somehow!

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  10. Wow I had no idea about any of this. I've just bought an old El Paso kit for tonight. And am going to make fajitas completely wrong :) (with some Indian spices in for good measure!). Learn something new and all that!

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    1. That really sounds like fun though - and you have made me feel heaps better for it! No doubt they'll be delish anyhow :)

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  11. All looks fab apart from the chicken. I don't make fajitas properly either, it seems, but might give this a go. How lovely to have such people around you.

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    1. We're all heathens, aren't we? Yes, it can be interesting!

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  12. Great post! Turns out I've been making fajitas and drinking tequila all wrong too. Hey ho.

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    1. Hey ho! Nothing wrong with practising and making up for lost time, eh? :)

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  13. wow wow wow so informative - love it!
    And new students since I stayed with you, and since the ones who last informed a food based blog post ;-)

    Fab post.
    Liska xxxx

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    1. Thank you - they've gone now too actually. Have handsome men only here and thought I'd only done a Carbonara post before? Will def be doing some more though, because they're such fun and people like them. xx

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  14. That was so interesting..... especially the part about the Tequila, and only drinking until you are 'happy' - sounds like a more sensible approach to alcohol than 'binge drinking'! XXX

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    1. Thank you - yes, it makes so much sense. All the students, no matter where they are from, are shocked at the alcohol intake they witness here - and I don't mean just at home ;) xx

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  15. Can they move in with me next?!
    I did not know that about fajitas or tequila!
    Sxx

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    1. You amaze me - not by the first bit, but the second! ;) xx

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